Sarah Sloat

Sarah Sloat is a former senior science editor at Inverse. She managed the Innovation, Science, and Mind and Body verticals. Sarah also writes Sunday Scaries, a mental health newsletter that's the weekend edition of Inverse Daily. Prior to the role, she was the Mind and Body editor and a senior staff writer.

When not reading her team's incredible work, she's reporting on the environment, ancient humans, and health. Her favorite stories are the weird ones. You can also find her bylines at The New Republic, Pacific Standard, McSweeney's Internet Tendency, and Bustle. She's worked extensively as a fact-checker and science consultant, most recently on Marvel's The Unstoppable Wasp. Embarrassingly, she's also performed comedy at Caveat and Upright Citizens Brigade. If you're looking for someone to chat science on your radio show or panel, she's done that, too.

Sunday Scaries

DNA Is Linked to Depression, but in Different Ways for Men and Women

The results tease out a curious connection between depression and metabolic disease in women.

Sunday Scaries

Here Are 5 Low-Lift Ways to Boost Mental Health

The more we commit to daily habits for small actions, the more likely we are to see the payoffs.

Sunday Scaries

Why Managing Emotions May Protect Your Brain from Old Age

Negative emotions can trigger changes in brain communication.

Sunday Scaries

One Overlooked Office Design Trick Could Make You Happier at Work

Office spaces can boost mental health — if they’re designed right.

Sunday Scaries

Do You Cause Your Own Stress? How To Stop a “Toxic Cycle”

New research illuminates the link between stress generation and anxiety.

Sunday Scaries

Low Exposure to Certain Pollutants Can Threaten Mental Health — Here's What To Know

New findings suggest “more strict air quality standards should be adopted.”

Sunday Scaries

Why the Antidote to Heartbreak May Lie in the Power of Stories

The end of a relationship doesn’t have to cause you long-term harm.

Sunday Scaries

Depression Meals: These 4 Easy Dinner Options Are Backed by Science

The food we eat when we need a quick meal is often food that’s worse for our mental health. But the contrary may also be true.

Sunday Scaries

How to take advantage of a bad mood

Science can explain the unique abilities linked to feeling sour.

Sunday Scaries

Cyclic breathing: Why experts say just 5 minutes a day can reduce stress

Inhale, exhale.

Sunday Scaries

The power of “non-negative” thinking

A negative self-schema can be changed through evidence.

Sunday Scaries

Covid-19-related stress caused some young people’s brains to age too fast — study

It’s unclear how long the changes might last.

Sunday Scaries

Brain activity may help unravel why some people feel disconnected from themselves

Pathological dissociation is also linked to a complex, subjective set of internal symptoms.

Sunday Scaries

Depression study reveals a critical difference between men and women

“Our vision is that one day we’ll have improved, individually tailored therapeutics.”

Sunday Scaries

Stressed-out stomach? Try 2 psychology hacks to boost gut health

For very stressed people, “the holidays can push their bodies into the red zone.”

Sunday Scaries

How to manage the holiday season when you're an introvert

“This type of structure can provide relief for introverts.”

Sunday Scaries

Happiness study reveals a critical difference between two types of people

If we want to understand life satisfaction, we need to understand past happiness.

Sunday Scaries

How to unblock your creativity: Scientists say this bad habit can help

Not all mind-wandering is created equal.

Sunday Scaires

Study finds a link between being a cat person and improved mental health

People most likely to be excited about cats displayed a key personality trait.

Sunday Scaries

Pumpkin seeds may boost brain health in 4 crucial ways

Here's the scientific reason why you should think twice before you throw out your pumpkin seeds.