Kiona Smith

Kiona Smith is a space reporter at Inverse. Nothing brings them more joy than a gleefully morbid description of a black hole or a deep speculative dive into what aliens might be like, except maybe a great pun. When Kiona isn't enthusiastically nerding out about space at Inverse, they also contribute freelance archaeology stories at Ars Technica. Over the last decade, Kiona has written online and in print at a number of other outlets. Their first book is available now from Running Press.

Kiona shares their office with a scruffy little dog and a very jumpy gecko. When not writing or voractiously reading, they're usually knitting, cross-stitching, tabletop gaming, or chasing Pokemon. Find them online in various places.

Space

A Famous Star Trek World Is Actually A Fancy Galactic Illusion

What astronomers thought might have been a planet in the exact location of Spock’s homeworld was actually an illusion all along.

ByKiona Smith
Space

Elusive Fast Radio Bursts In Space Probably Come From the Most Ordinary Galaxies

A recent study traced 28 fast radio bursts to very average galaxies, with unremarkable magnetic fields and very little drama.

ByKiona Smith
Space

A Radio Telescope Captured the Noise Humanity Leaks Into Space

ROLSES had a bumpy ride aboard the Odysseus Lander earlier this year, but it still pulled off some cool science.

ByKiona Smith
Space

In an Extremely Unlikely First, Scientists Found Frost On the Peak of Mars’ Volcano Olympus Mons

A team of scientists recently discovered frozen water in an unlikely place on Mars.

ByKiona Smith
Space

NASA Needs SpaceX’s Starship to Work — Here’s the Critical Reason Why

It's Not Just About Artemis 3, there's also an important side quest.

ByKiona Smith
Space

'The Acolyte' Got Fire In Space Ridiculously Wrong — In Real Life, Its So Much Weirder

We get it. Star Wars isn't science fiction. But still.

ByKiona Smith
Space

This Hot, Inflated Alien World Is A Preview of Earth’s Final Days

If anyone lives on Earth in 5 billion years, they may get to live just a little bit longer.

ByKiona Smith
Space

The ESA’s Swarm Satellites Recorded “Something Peculiar” In The Northern Sky

"Eh! Steve!"

ByKiona Smith
space

This Dwarf Planet Is Basically A Sweet Red Snow Cone

Please do not lick the science.

ByKiona Smith
space

What Cicadas Can Teach Us About Living On Alien Planets

Cicadas act and look like creatures from an alien invasion movie. But could these patient burrowing bugs survive on another planet?

ByKiona Smith
space

New Data Reveals How Galaxies Grew in the Early Universe

These new galaxies in the early universe were still hungrily gobbling up nearby gas.

ByKiona Smith
science

Cicadas Don’t Hibernate Underground for Years — It’s a Lot Weirder Than That

Trillions of cicadas sit underground for years doing what, exactly?

ByKiona Smith
space

This Solar Probe Just Helped To Trace The Origins Of Space Weather

ESA’s Solar Orbiter went nearly as close as Mercury to find out how and why solar winds form.

ByKiona Smith
Space

An Astrobiologist Reveals Why She’s Optimistic We’ll Find Alien Life On Another Planet

Inverse spoke to astrobiologist Lisa Kaltenegger about how life changes the atmosphere of its planet and how we can spot it.

ByKiona Smith
Science

How NASA Misplaced a Whole Forest of Moon Trees

Remember the trees grown around the U.S. from seeds that made it to the Moon? No? Well, there’s a reason for that.

ByKiona Smith
Space

The 'Star Trek: Discovery' Series Finale Features Ridiculously Weird But Real Physics

Yes, black holes can really do that.

ByKiona Smith
Space

The Sun's Magnetic Field Starts Just Beneath the Surface, New Study Reveals

The Sun's magnetic field, which drives solar storms and solar wind, doesn't originate deep within the Sun after all.

ByKiona Smith
Science

Cicadas Squirt Jets of Pee Out Their Backsides — And That’s Not Even The Weirdest Part

“Feeding and excretion are hallmarks of life.”

ByKiona Smith
Science

A Radical New Experiment Used Synthetic Quartz To Capture Artificial Heat

The novel feat shows that channeling enough solar energy can generate industrial-grade heat.

ByKiona Smith
Space

The Webb Telescope Found A Lava Planet with a Carbon Dioxide Atmosphere

55 Cancri e is a terrible place, but at least its atmosphere isn't actually vaporized rock.

ByKiona Smith